Currently showing posts tagged the cynic & the fool

  • Available Now | The Cynic & the Fool: The Unconscious in Theology & Politics

    I'm tremendously excited to say that my new book, The Cynic & the Fool: The Unconscious in Theology & Politics, is available now! Order through the online global behemoth, directly from the publisher for the lowest price, or better yet through your local brick and mortal bookstore. 

    Ever since publishing God Is Unconscious, I’ve wanted to release another book without the jargon—something more accessible for those who don’t have unlimited time to read philosophy. I wanted to take some of the material from GIU, import the research I was conducting for my dissertation, and pay more attention to story and examples. I wanted something any of my students could read. The timing of when I wrote C&F, especially with how the political landscape has since shifted, has been extremely odd. I aim to keep oscillating back and forth between the academic and the accessible during my career, and I’m thrilled to have a more accessible book out now.

    SYNOPSIS

    The questioning of religion is the beginning of a flood, one that cannot be contained and will soon drown every theological, political, economic, and cultural orthodoxy that pledged its allegiance to a sinking cause. We are in just such an era of revolt, and those with eyes to see are learning to interrogate motives. When we are told of an idea that cannot possibly be true, the most immediate question is this: does the speaker so very foolishly believe their own words, or is the person a cynic who knows perfectly well how they manipulate the truth? As individual personalities transform into a collective drive, the aftermath is a brutal mix of motives, fictions, and anxieties. 

    The Cynic & the Fool explores theology and politics through the lens of our unconscious motives, our clever repression, and our deceptive denial. In nine chapters interspersed with nine parables, DeLay unites psychoanalysis, philosophy, and theology together for an accessible yet critical theory of culture. There could not be a more crucial moment to settle these questions. Why do we feel such anxiety over the most abstract orthodoxies, what conflicts of interest are we facing, and why we are commanded to see the world a certain way? 

    ENDORSEMENTS 

    "At a time when vicious partisan politics has replaced the wars of religion with their odium theologicum of bygone ages, Tad DeLay's Cynic & the Fool is a must-read for thoughtful people, regardless of their ideological persuasion. Through storytelling, personal anecdote, and frequent flashes of magisterial pedagogy, DeLay entices us into confronting the knotted tangles of our own 'political unconscious' and offers us hope that we will eventually know the truth and that it might free us, even if we are in a so-called 'post-truth' era." – Carl Raschke, University of Denver, author of Critical Theology 

    "Tad DeLay continues his remarkable and insightful exploration of Lacan's work and its intersections with theology in this new book. The term psychoanalytic theology would probably not arouse too much excitement except in the most arcane of circles, but that is the arena in which DeLay does his work, and it is marvelous stuff. Riffing from a Lacanian idea about the role of the cynic and fool in the political realm, he delves deep into the psyche of our times, to explore what he calls the 'dynamics of collective belief.' DeLay's gift is his ability to take complex ideas and open them up so that we can all see ourselves, and each other, a bit more clearly. This new work is courageous, challenging, and so worth the journey." – Barry Taylor, Affiliate Professor of Theology and Culture, Fuller Theological Seminary 

    "While The Cynic & the Fool offers the reader insights that feel timeless, its true power lies in its ability to offer a unique and penetrating analysis of our present age. This is a book that employs the best of psychoanalytic theory to reflect on larger, societal issues. It is a carefully crafted work that will prove invaluable to anyone wanting to wrestle with, and understand, the tumultuous times we live in." – Peter Rollins, author of The Divine Magician

  • I did not intend to write this book at this moment

    The Cynic & the Fool: The Unconscious in Theology & Politics is available today.

    Immediately after publishing God Is Unconscious, I knew I’d write another. I wanted something more accessible, more personal, and not for my academic fields alone. I was beginning dissertation research and had all this new information that I wanted more than just my committee to see. I would soon start teaching undergraduates, and I wanted a book any of my students could find helpful. So three months after GIU was published, I sat down to draft The Cynic & the Fool. 

    I organized the book around a simple question: when we hear a claim that cannot possibly be true, (1) is the false claim pouring forth from the misinformed yet honest fool, or (2) is the claim being twisted by a cynical nihilist who knows perfectly well how to manipulate and mislead? A quote was stuck in my head: “The fundamental problem of political philosophy is still precisely…’Why do men fight for their servitude as stubbornly as though it were their salvation?’”

    But I kept stumbling through examples which seemed perfectly irrelevant at the time. I explored how delusional news stories and conspiratorial thinking operate, though these were seldom in the public conversation. I covered theories of populism, fearing it was wasted page space since America hadn't had a genuine populist movement in decades. I wrote of the aggressive drive of white supremacy, the enjoyment of cruelty in American religion, and the theological investment we put in empty symbols, which leads us to praise hypocrisy as a virtue rather than vice. For the first time, I cautiously wrote of losing a job as a pastor when my understanding of LGBT persons matured. I wrote about economics, debt, and our repetitive demand for lower pay and fewer services. I explored how widespread apocalypticism ensures the world will burn not from the fire of heaven but instead from the heat of carbon. I wrote about the Evangelical-Capitalist resonance machine—how do we understand the former’s enjoyment in being the puppet of the latter? How can we analyze our crises when we not subjects who desire knowledge but instead subjects who blindly desire? I hesitated over so many stories, arguments, and examples I feared would seem unnecessary at best or indefensibly paranoid at worst. 

    I feel a mix of excitement and horror at my work now. I wrote that first draft in May 2015. A month later, a certain business mogul would declare his candidacy, and ever since this question—knave or idiot?—proliferates in the background of the chaos.


  • Artwork for The Cynic & the Fool

    This spring, my second book will go to print. I have been so excited to see this out there ever since publishing God Is Unconscious. While my first book was exactly what I wanted and needed it to be at the time, I've always felt there are definite limits to how much my work matters unless I also learn how to communicate a without the academic language. So I set out to alternate between writing academic and more accessible books every year or two. The Cynic & the Fool: the Unconscious in Theology & Politics aims to strip away the clinical jargon and deliver a critical philosophy mixed with more personal experiences and interspersed with stories in between each chapter. 

    I didn't, of course, plan for this to feel like so timely, but I organized the book around one question: when we hear a claim that cannot possibly be true, is the false claim pouring forth from the misinformed yet honest fool, or is the claim being twisted by a cynical nihilist who knows perfectly well know to manipulate and mislead? With everything going on in the world at the moment, there's never been a more important time to ask this question of those who have (unfortunately) found themselves in power. 

    Thanks to Jesse Turri for once again delivering the cover art. He won't tell you this, but he created the art for GIU and C&F without asking for anything in return except donations to nonprofits. 

    And if you know the writing of Kester Brewin, the forward definitely has his no bullshit style.